Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom


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What Challenges Do Students with ASD Experience in School?

Always praise the student when he remembers something he has previously forgotten. Never denigrate or "harp" at him when he fails. A lecture on the subject will not only NOT help, it will often make the problem worse. He may begin to believe he can not remember to do or bring these things. These students seem to have either the neatest or the messiest desks or lockers in the school.


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The one with the messiest desk will need your help in frequent cleanups of the desk or locker so that he can find things. Simply remember that he is probably not making a conscious choice to be messy. He is most likely incapable of this organizational task without specific training.

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Attempt to train him in organizational skills using small, specific steps. People with autism have problems with abstract and conceptual thinking. Some may eventually acquire abstract skills, but others never will. When abstract concepts must be used, use visual cues, such as drawings or written words, to augment the abstract idea. Be as concrete as possible in all your interactions with these students.

Avoid asking vague questions such as, "Why did you do that?


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Next time put the book down gently and tell me you are angry. Were you showing me that you did not want to go to gym, or that you did not want to stop reading? An increase in unusual or difficult behaviors probably indicates an increase in stress. Sometimes stress is caused by feeling a loss of control. Many times the stress will only be alleviated when the student physically removes himself from the stressful event or situation.

Inclusion of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

When this occurs, a "safe place" or "safe person" may come in handy. Do not take misbehavior personally. The high-functioning person with autism is not a manipulative, scheming person who is trying to make life difficult. They are seldom, if ever, capable of being manipulative. Usually misbehavior is the result of efforts to survive experiences which may be confusing, disorienting, or frightening. People with autism are, by virtue of their disability, egocentric. The other students had given her projects spanning an average of about three pages in length.

I proudly gave her my special project of twenty-six pages, illustrations, and drawings. She gave me an A… p. In managing projects, teachers should set clear timelines, teach students how to chart their own progress and develop progress reports, and help students to produce a final product or products.

Harmin suggests that teachers steer students away from projects that involve copy work and passive learning and point them towards those activities that will inspire higher order thinking and meaningful engagement.

Whole school organisation

In order to prevent students from engaging in excessive pencil and paper work, ask them to design a model, compare ideas, create a product, or produce a mural Harmin, Bigelow, B. Getting off the track: Stories from an untracked classroom. From Rethinking Schools Eds. Rethinking our classrooms: Teaching for equity and justice. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools. Onosko, J. Unit and lesson planning in the inclusive classroom: Maximizing learning opportunities for all students.

Autism, PDD-NOS & Asperger's fact sheets | Effects of Autism on education and school

Jorgensen Ed. Baltimore: Brookes. Tomlinson, C. How to differentiate instruction in a mixed-ability classroom. The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners.

About This Item

Williams, D. Nobody nowhere: The extraordinary biography of an autistic. New York: Avon. Tags: inclusive classroom , inclusive education , Paula Kluth.

Strategies for teaching children with autism

Editorial Policy: Autism Awareness Centre believes that education is the key to success in assisting individuals who have autism and related disorders. This allows students to concretely see what is going on throughout the day, so they know what to prepare for and what activity they will be doing next.

Some autistic children have trouble going from one activity to the next, so this visual schedule can help to reduce stress. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders usually do not cope with chaotic unpredictable environments. Teachers can provide support by providing the child with timetables and the steps for activities. Research has shown that working in pairs may be beneficial in teaching autistic children.

These students have problems not only with language and communication, but with socialization as well. By facilitating peer interaction, teachers can help these students make friends, which in turn can help them cope with problems. This can help them to become more integrated into the mainstream environment of the classroom. The aide is able to give more elaborate directions that the teacher may not have time to explain to the autistic child and can help the child to stay at a equivalent level to the rest of the class through the special one-on-one instruction.

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However, some argue that students with one-on-one aides may become overly dependent on the help, thus leading to difficulty with independence later on. There are many different techniques that teachers can use to assist their students. Every child is going to be different and teachers have to be able to adjust with every one of them.

Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders sometimes have high levels of anxiety and stress, particularly in social environments like school.

Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom
Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching Children with High-Functioning Autism: Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom

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